David Harris, Writer

author, journalist, activist

Media

Library Thing – undated

Furman University  Рundated

The Boys Who Said No – 2019

Contemporary Anarchism – 2017

The Encyclopedia of the Vietnam War – 2011

Marin Magazine – 2009

The Midpen Media Center – 2009

Commonwealth Club – 2007

Street Spirit – 2005

Antiwar.com – 2003

Confronting the War Machine – 2003

The Spirit of the Sixties – 1997

Los Angeles Times – 1986

WGBH – 1982

SF Gate – 1995

People Magazine – 1978

The Stanford Daily – 1969

Carry It On – 1969

Pacifica Radio – 1968

The Stanford Daily – 1967

Bob Fitch Photography Archive 1967-2014


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1 Comment

  1. Mr. Harris,
    I am a proud San Diegan, I was born in 1967. I became enamored with the Vietnam generation through my developing interest in music, and in particular, the music of the Vietnam era. Public education failed miserably covering Vietnam in U.S. History class. Since then, I have instinctively sought to learn more about this war, and this era, and answer the questions why a war of this magnitude, was barely made mention of. Truth be told, I grew up with some boys that lost their fathers in Vietnam, fathers they never remembered meeting. So throughout my life I have been filling this void with information wherever I can find it or inquire; yet I have only partially quenched my thirst for more insight into the whole Vietnam apparatus at home as well as in the jungles.

    A few years ago I became privy to the Constellation Vote, and the film \”Connie Stay Home\”. However, the film soon disappeared from internet searches. I reached out to Joan Baez\’s manager, who put me in touch with Neil Reichline and he kindly mailed us a DVD of the film. Gratefully we got it yesterday.

    We run a modest film production company in San Diego called Resulting Impact Film Productions, and our name is our mission statement. We seek to empower audiences with stories of solutions, and more times than not those solutions are reached through organizational efforts. \”Muerte O Gloria The Rise of The American Soccer Fan\” is a film about the first American soccer fan supporters group in Major League Soccer. Our second Film is \”A Line in the Sand The Story of America\’s first Surfing Park\” which covers San Diego\’s rich surfing history and the 1960\’s protests by Surfers that shifted the public\’s attention to preserving coastal access, led to the creation of Tourmaline Surf Park in North Pacific Beach in San Diego and ultimately contributed to the creation of the Coastal Preservation Act of 1972. The film is up for broadcast consideration on KPBS and we are looking to hear back from the program director soon.

    Citizens in my hometown San Diego have done what is right time and time again when called upon. I humbly ask if there exists any physical records of the Constellation Vote? What were the final tallies/results? How did this vote come to be? How was the Connie Vote organized and coordinated on the grassroots level?

    Organizing, though a fundamental constitutional right, is under constant threat by an unreal (and most likely unconstitutional) level of surveillance. What can be gleaned from the \”underground\” and the anti-war movement to be usefully deployed today?What procedures can the current generations employ today that succeeded in our past?

    May we engage you in a dialogue? Though we would seek to stay within the subject matter of the Connie Vote; to be honest I feel we may have a lot more questions for you and your reflections on a diverse range of subjects would prove to be very timely and important.

    Thank you,
    Matthew S. Melin

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